Recommendations, Part 1: Science Fiction

There’s nothing we like better than matching people to books they’ll love. Over the course next week, we’ll post a (very) few of our category recommendations here. For more (and/or more personal) recommendations, drop in or give us a call.

Today’s category: Science Fiction

Company Town, by Madeline Ashby
Hwa is strong, well-trained, and one of the few non-augemented residents of New Arcadia, a giant oil rig just offshore in the Maritimes. When Lynch Ltd. buys the rig, Hwa is hired to guard Joel, the youngest member of the Lynch family. Which turns out to be a much tougher job than she anticipated, especially when a series of local murders might turn out to be linked by more than just geography. Smart, fast-paced, and satisfying.

Death’s End, by Cixin Liu
The final book in the series (following Three-Body Problem and Dark Forest) begins fifty years later. Earthlings and Trisolarans exist in an uneasy detente, each beginning to adopt the technology and habits of the other. But when scientist Cheng Xin wakes from a long hibernation, she brings with her knowledge that might upset that delicate balance for good. An epic conclusion to a groundbreaking series.

Take Us To Your Chief, by Drew Hayden Taylor
The stories in this collection contain many familiar SF tropes: aliens, both peaceful and hostile; voyages into outer space; time-travel; nascent artificial intelligence — all framed by a First Nations outlook. Sometimes funny, sometimes moving, and always smart, the stories in this collection are an invigorating blend of classic SF and modern First Nations discourse.

Too Like The Lightning, by Ada Palmer
Mycroft, a criminal sentenced to be as useful as he can to anyone he encounters, meets Carlyle, a spiritual minster to a world which has outlawed religion. Theirs is a world of technology-driven abundance and control. But when they come across young Bridger, they discover the wild card that might send their whole system crashing down. Inventive and wildly interesting.

Last Year, by Robert Charles Wilson
In the near future, technology opens doors to the past, or at least to a version of the past that stops being our past when it meets the future now. The doorways become tourist destinations for the rich of both times, and time-native economies spring up to cater to the growing communities. Jesse, one such native of the past, is in love with a woman from our time and determined to follow her back home. But there are secrets from the past, present, and future in his way. Thoughtful and written with real sensitivity.

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