Archive for the ‘News’ Category

First New Books Of The New Year

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017

And just in time, too. If this weather doesn’t make you want to stay in with a good book, you’re prolly at least 38% fish.

Hardcover
Heart Of What Was Lost, Tad Williams
Dead Man’s Steel, Luke Scull
Defiant, Dave Bara
Cursed Queen, Sarah Fine
Golden Gate, Robert Buettner
1636: Ottoman Onslaught, Eric Flint
Ever The Hunted, Erin Summerhill

Trade Paperback
This Census Taker, China Miéville
Dark Days Club, Alison Goodman
Glittering World, Robert Levy
Imposter Queen, Sarah Fine
Unhooked, Lisa Maxwell
Boss Fight, Annie Bellet
Idealist, Justin Peters
Last Sacrifice, James A. Moore
Iron Ghost, Jen Williams

Mass Market
Battle Hill Bolero, Daniel José Older
Silverwolf, Jacey Bedford
Starbound, Dave Bara

And To All, A Good Night

Saturday, December 31st, 2016

Whether your plan is to welcome the New Year with open arms or just set a match to the old year and walk away, be safe out there tonight. The TTC is FREE from 7pm onwards, so there’s no excuse not to be. Remember, only morons drink and drive.

Happy New Year, friends.

Counting Down

Friday, December 30th, 2016

Tomorrow, Saturday December 31st, we’ll close at 4pm. We’ll be closed all day Sunday January 1st. Then we’re back to our regular hours as of Monday January 2nd.

Which means you still have most of two days left to take advantage of our Boxing Time sale!

Last New Titles Of The Year

Tuesday, December 27th, 2016

Lots of sad news today. Here are a few last new titles, just so we can think about something else for a while.

Hardcover
Take Back The Sky, Greg Bear
SW: Rogue One, Alexander Freed

Trade Paperback
Barsk, Lawrence M. Schoen

Mass Market
If This Goes Wrong, Hank Davis, editor
Nine Of Stars, Laura Bickle
Mission: Tomorrow, Bryan Thomas Schmidt, editor

We’re Baaaack!

Tuesday, December 27th, 2016

And we’re on sale!  All week, everything in store is 10% off.

Except graphic novels, which are 25% off.

 

Have fun!

 

Our Holiday Hours

Thursday, December 22nd, 2016

Here’s our schedule for the upcoming week.

Friday December 23rd:  11-7
Saturday December 24th:  11-4

Sunday December 25th:  Closed
Monday December 26th:  Closed

Tuesday December 27th – Friday December 30th:  11-7 (regular hours)

Yes, we’ll be closed on Boxing Day. But we’ll open up as usual the following day, and be here all week with bargains for you.

Right, Sorry: New Releases

Wednesday, December 21st, 2016

Sorry. Forgot to post the new releases yesterday — sorry about that. There aren’t many, but they deserve to be seen.

Hardcover
The Gradual, Christopher Priest
The Passenger, F.R. Tallis
Moshi-Moshi, Banana Yoshimoto

Trade Paperback
Pantomime, Laura Lam
Shadow Queen, C.J. Redwine
Dead Living, Glenn Buillon

Mass Market
Insurgence, Ken MacLeod
Assassin’s Creed, Christie Golden

Recommendations, Part 4: Middle Grade and Young Readers

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016

Darkest Dark, by Chris Hadfield
My eyes are not leaking: YOUR eyes are leaking. Ok, maybe it’s both of us. But it’s a lovely true book for space kids and space adults, and for kids afraid of the dark and their wide-awake parents. Gorgeously illustrated by the Fan brothers, this is a true Canadian gem.

King Baby, by Kate Beaton
Anyone who has ever been around a small tyrant will recognize King Baby and his loyal (if exhausted) subjects. Beaton brings the skill and humour from her ‘Hark, A Vagrant’ cartoons to bear in this charming story.

Mighty Jack, by Ben Hatke
Unlike most kids, Jack doesn’t love summer vacation. His mom takes a second job, and Jack is left to watch over his non-verbal sister Maddy. But at a flea market one day, Maddy speaks for the first time, and tells Jack to trade their mom’s car for a box of mysterious seeds. Zaniness ensues. If you liked Hatke’s wonderful Zita books, you’ll like Mighty Jack.

Narwhal: Unicorn Of The Sea, by Ben Clanton
Your early reader will love this sweet, goofy, imaginative story about a narwhal and his jellyfish best friend, with deep sea factoids. Narwhals are great! (And jellyfish too!)

Witch’s Vaccum Cleaner, by Terry Pratchett
This collection spans decades. Most of the stories are from the earliest part of Pratchett’s career, but some are more recent. All have his trademark humour and warmth. If you miss Pratchett as much as we do, this book is not to be missed.

Recommendations, Part 2: Fantasy

Sunday, December 18th, 2016

Accident Of Stars, by Foz Meadows
A great, chewy Big Fat Fantasy that asks questions like “What if the Worldwalker and her allies back the wrong horse?” Gwen Vere, late of Australia, has regretted putting Leoden on the throne of Kena for years. Now a new generation of Worldwalkers and allies has arisen, and it may be time to make things right. Very enjoyable!

Edge Of Worlds, by Martha Wells
Wells widens the view with her newest book, moving away from the Reaches, and the courts, and friends (and enemies) the Raksura know. Which is fine, because Moon, Jade, Stone, and the rest are perfectly able to make friends (and yes, enemies) wherever they go. I cannot get enough of Wells’ Raksura books; this one is adventure on an epic scale.

Spells Of Blood And Kin, by Claire Humphrey
Alternately following Lissa, who’s taken over her just-deceased Russian grandmother’s responsibilities as a witch; Maksim, whose leashed curse comes roaring back with the witch’s death; and Nick, whose bloody encounter with Maksim brings out the very worst in him, Spells builds tension beautifully while staying thoughtful about the legacies we pass down to each other for good or ill, and what they cost. It’s a curiously compassionate, atmospheric look at violent conflict, and never what I expected.

Stiletto, by Daniel O’Malley
In many ways, Stiletto is about the diplomatic aftermath of an almost-war, in which the supernatural Chequy and the scientifically advanced Grafters have to figure out how to get along. Since each group has been culturally inculcated to hate and fear the other for centuries, the process is… tense. But when the peace talks are threatened, it’ll take the combined efforts of Chequy agent Felicity and Grafter Odette to save the whole process. And, hopefully, the world. Action-packed and very moving, punctuated by a number of quite funny moments.

Summerlong, by Peter S. Beagle
Simple on the surface — a retired professor and airline stewardess’s lives blow apart then come back together after they take in a mysterious young woman — Summerlong is anything but. It’s a beautifully crafted Persephone tale that goes headfirst into the full implications of what a spring rebirth means, and captures all the terrifying, exhilarating power of a brush with deity. This is a book suffused with awe in the oldest sense of the word: beauty, and safety, and terror. A masterpiece.

Recommendations, Part 1: Science Fiction

Thursday, December 15th, 2016

There’s nothing we like better than matching people to books they’ll love. Over the course next week, we’ll post a (very) few of our category recommendations here. For more (and/or more personal) recommendations, drop in or give us a call.

Today’s category: Science Fiction

Company Town, by Madeline Ashby
Hwa is strong, well-trained, and one of the few non-augemented residents of New Arcadia, a giant oil rig just offshore in the Maritimes. When Lynch Ltd. buys the rig, Hwa is hired to guard Joel, the youngest member of the Lynch family. Which turns out to be a much tougher job than she anticipated, especially when a series of local murders might turn out to be linked by more than just geography. Smart, fast-paced, and satisfying.

Death’s End, by Cixin Liu
The final book in the series (following Three-Body Problem and Dark Forest) begins fifty years later. Earthlings and Trisolarans exist in an uneasy detente, each beginning to adopt the technology and habits of the other. But when scientist Cheng Xin wakes from a long hibernation, she brings with her knowledge that might upset that delicate balance for good. An epic conclusion to a groundbreaking series.

Take Us To Your Chief, by Drew Hayden Taylor
The stories in this collection contain many familiar SF tropes: aliens, both peaceful and hostile; voyages into outer space; time-travel; nascent artificial intelligence — all framed by a First Nations outlook. Sometimes funny, sometimes moving, and always smart, the stories in this collection are an invigorating blend of classic SF and modern First Nations discourse.

Too Like The Lightning, by Ada Palmer
Mycroft, a criminal sentenced to be as useful as he can to anyone he encounters, meets Carlyle, a spiritual minster to a world which has outlawed religion. Theirs is a world of technology-driven abundance and control. But when they come across young Bridger, they discover the wild card that might send their whole system crashing down. Inventive and wildly interesting.

Last Year, by Robert Charles Wilson
In the near future, technology opens doors to the past, or at least to a version of the past that stops being our past when it meets the future now. The doorways become tourist destinations for the rich of both times, and time-native economies spring up to cater to the growing communities. Jesse, one such native of the past, is in love with a woman from our time and determined to follow her back home. But there are secrets from the past, present, and future in his way. Thoughtful and written with real sensitivity.