Recommendations, Part 3: Young Adult

December 19th, 2016

Bright Smoke, Cold Fire, by Rosamund Hodge
I was seriously impressed by this, the first truly original retelling of the Romeo and Juliet mythos I’ve read. Viyara is the last city left in the world, made safe from the Ruining by the blood sacrifice of the Sisters of Thorn. But there is a necromancer loose in the city who could doom them all, unless Juliet, Romeo, Paris, and Runajo can stop it. Lush, gorgeous, bloody, and imaginative.

Keeper Of the Mists, by Rachel Neumeier
As the illegitimate daughter of her country’s Lord, Keri knew it theoretically possible she might inherit her father’s magic, but she never expected it to actually happen. But when her father dies, and the magic that conceals their country from its enemies fails with him, Keri’s going to have to figure out what to do – and who to trust – fast. Lovely prose and an interesting new world.

Lie Tree, by Frances Hardinge
Faith might act like modest and well-mannered, girl, but she is also fiercely intelligent and observant. She knows the real reason her family has relocated; she also know her father’s death was not an accident. The answer might lie with the strange tree she finds among his possessions: a tree that will reveal hidden truths when fed lies. A powerful story about truth, lies, family, and the great and terrible things we do for (and to) them. Astonishingly good.

Long Way To A Small Angry Planet, by Becky Chambers
Chambers simultaneously scratches the itch for Bujoldian, galaxy-spanning space opera and creates a universe that’s modern, diverse, and joyful. The Wayfarer’s crew tackle boarding parties, red tape, messy families, queer relationships, imminent galactic war, and interspecies workplace misunderstandngs with the same uncynical energy: each are equally important and vital parts of their lives. Delightful, ebullient, and kind.

The Skids, by Ian Donald Keeling
Like all the Skids in the Skidsphere, Johnny Drop has only five years to live. Live fast; die fast; eat sugar in between – that’s the Skid way. But Johnny’s about to discover that not only is the world bigger and stranger than he’d ever imagined, but it’s also in serious danger. And he can’t save it alone. Smart, funny, action-packed, and compulsively readable.

Recommendations, Part 2: Fantasy

December 18th, 2016

Accident Of Stars, by Foz Meadows
A great, chewy Big Fat Fantasy that asks questions like “What if the Worldwalker and her allies back the wrong horse?” Gwen Vere, late of Australia, has regretted putting Leoden on the throne of Kena for years. Now a new generation of Worldwalkers and allies has arisen, and it may be time to make things right. Very enjoyable!

Edge Of Worlds, by Martha Wells
Wells widens the view with her newest book, moving away from the Reaches, and the courts, and friends (and enemies) the Raksura know. Which is fine, because Moon, Jade, Stone, and the rest are perfectly able to make friends (and yes, enemies) wherever they go. I cannot get enough of Wells’ Raksura books; this one is adventure on an epic scale.

Spells Of Blood And Kin, by Claire Humphrey
Alternately following Lissa, who’s taken over her just-deceased Russian grandmother’s responsibilities as a witch; Maksim, whose leashed curse comes roaring back with the witch’s death; and Nick, whose bloody encounter with Maksim brings out the very worst in him, Spells builds tension beautifully while staying thoughtful about the legacies we pass down to each other for good or ill, and what they cost. It’s a curiously compassionate, atmospheric look at violent conflict, and never what I expected.

Stiletto, by Daniel O’Malley
In many ways, Stiletto is about the diplomatic aftermath of an almost-war, in which the supernatural Chequy and the scientifically advanced Grafters have to figure out how to get along. Since each group has been culturally inculcated to hate and fear the other for centuries, the process is… tense. But when the peace talks are threatened, it’ll take the combined efforts of Chequy agent Felicity and Grafter Odette to save the whole process. And, hopefully, the world. Action-packed and very moving, punctuated by a number of quite funny moments.

Summerlong, by Peter S. Beagle
Simple on the surface — a retired professor and airline stewardess’s lives blow apart then come back together after they take in a mysterious young woman — Summerlong is anything but. It’s a beautifully crafted Persephone tale that goes headfirst into the full implications of what a spring rebirth means, and captures all the terrifying, exhilarating power of a brush with deity. This is a book suffused with awe in the oldest sense of the word: beauty, and safety, and terror. A masterpiece.

Recommendations, Part 1: Science Fiction

December 15th, 2016

There’s nothing we like better than matching people to books they’ll love. Over the course next week, we’ll post a (very) few of our category recommendations here. For more (and/or more personal) recommendations, drop in or give us a call.

Today’s category: Science Fiction

Company Town, by Madeline Ashby
Hwa is strong, well-trained, and one of the few non-augemented residents of New Arcadia, a giant oil rig just offshore in the Maritimes. When Lynch Ltd. buys the rig, Hwa is hired to guard Joel, the youngest member of the Lynch family. Which turns out to be a much tougher job than she anticipated, especially when a series of local murders might turn out to be linked by more than just geography. Smart, fast-paced, and satisfying.

Death’s End, by Cixin Liu
The final book in the series (following Three-Body Problem and Dark Forest) begins fifty years later. Earthlings and Trisolarans exist in an uneasy detente, each beginning to adopt the technology and habits of the other. But when scientist Cheng Xin wakes from a long hibernation, she brings with her knowledge that might upset that delicate balance for good. An epic conclusion to a groundbreaking series.

Take Us To Your Chief, by Drew Hayden Taylor
The stories in this collection contain many familiar SF tropes: aliens, both peaceful and hostile; voyages into outer space; time-travel; nascent artificial intelligence — all framed by a First Nations outlook. Sometimes funny, sometimes moving, and always smart, the stories in this collection are an invigorating blend of classic SF and modern First Nations discourse.

Too Like The Lightning, by Ada Palmer
Mycroft, a criminal sentenced to be as useful as he can to anyone he encounters, meets Carlyle, a spiritual minster to a world which has outlawed religion. Theirs is a world of technology-driven abundance and control. But when they come across young Bridger, they discover the wild card that might send their whole system crashing down. Inventive and wildly interesting.

Last Year, by Robert Charles Wilson
In the near future, technology opens doors to the past, or at least to a version of the past that stops being our past when it meets the future now. The doorways become tourist destinations for the rich of both times, and time-native economies spring up to cater to the growing communities. Jesse, one such native of the past, is in love with a woman from our time and determined to follow her back home. But there are secrets from the past, present, and future in his way. Thoughtful and written with real sensitivity.

New Books For This Awesome New Weather We’re Having

December 13th, 2016

(Not kidding — I love winter. Many disagree, but that’s okay. They’re allowed to be wrong.)

Hardcover
Babylon’s Ashes, James S.A. Corey
Crystal Storm, Morgan Rhodes
Nature Of A Pirate, A.M. Dellamonica (signed!)
Last Year, Robert Charles Wilson (signed!)

Trade Paperback
Night Witch, Ben Aaronovitch et al
Lost Chronicles Of Sherlock Holmes Vol #2, Denis O. Smith
Path Of The Hawk, Ian Graham
Medusa’s Web, Tim Powers
The Immortals, Jordanna Max Brodsky
After The Crown, K.B. Wagers

Mass Market
League Of Dragons, Naomi Novik

Pah-Tay

December 9th, 2016

Reminder: tomorrow, Saturday December 10th, is our Mostly-But-Not-Quite-Annual Christmas Party!

The good times will last all day. We’ll have tasty snacks and refreshments, free gift-wrapping, and a store-wide discount. And this year, we also have special guests!

At 3pm, authors A.M. Dellamonica and Robert Charles Wilson will be here to celebrate their brand new titles (Nature Of A Pirate and Last Year, respectively).

Join us for holiday treats and a darned good time.

 

Public Service Announcement

December 7th, 2016

We’ve never had cause to publish a comprehensive position paper on the matter, but for future reference (and for the health and safety of, well, everyone), a helpful primer:

Things Not To Attempt To Mansplain To Our Staff
– feminism
– bookselling
– anything, ever

Some New Titles This Week

December 6th, 2016

But only some of them: others will be arriving later. Because that’s super-convenient…

Hardcover
Dreamweaver, C.S. Friedman
Immortal Throne, Stella Gemmell
My Sweet Little Megabyte, Jeffrey Burton
Monster Hunter Memoirs: Sinners, Larry Correia
George Lucas: A Life, Brian Jay Jones

Trade Paperback
Spindle, E.K. Johnston
Season Of Spells, Sylvia Izzo Hunter
1635: Wars For The Rhine, Anette Pederson
Map Of Bones, Francesca Haig
Snake Eyes, Hillary Monahan
Deep Sea Diver’s Syndrome, Serge Brussolo
Judgment At Verdant Court, M.C. Planck
The Liberation, Ian Tregillis
Midnight City: Fleshtree, G.M.B Chomichuk

Mass Market
Alien Nation, Gini Koch
Dragon Spawn, Eileen Wilks
Jerusalem Fire, Rebecca Meluch
Tempest, Mercedes Lacky, editor
Enter Halo, Keri Arthur
Feast Of All Souls, Simon Bestwick
Five Stories High, K.J. Parker
Doom Of The Dragon, Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman
Speak To The Devil, Dave Duncan

Tis That Season

December 5th, 2016
…the season for our Almost-But-Not-Quite-Annual Christmas party!

Please join us here at the store on Saturday December 10th. All day long, we’ll have tasty snacks, free gift-wrapping, and a store-wide discount.

In addition, at 3pm, we’ll welcome two very special guests: A.M. Dellamonica and Robert Charles Wilson, both of whom have brand new books this week (Nature Of A Pirate and Last Year, respectively).

Who doesn’t love a party? Okay, some people don’t. But this one’s special, and you should totally come!

Some New Books For You

November 29th, 2016

Hardcover
Prince Lestat And The Realms Of Atlantis, Anne Rice
Watchmen Noir, Alan Moore
Pirate Utopia, Bruce Sterling

Trade Paperback
Traitor Baru Cormorant, Seth Dickinson
Wicked Weeds, Pedro Cabiya
Styx, Bavo Dhooge
Fate Of The Tearling, Erika Johansen
Angels Of Our Better Beasts, Jerome Stueart
Hawk, Steven Brust
Normal, Warren Ellis

Mass Market
Kill Baxter, Charlie Human
1635: Parcel Of Rogues, Eric Flint & Dennis Andrew
Her Brother’s Keeper, Mike Kupari
Blockade, Jean Johnson
Confluence, S.K. Dunstall
Corporation Wars: Dissidence, Ken MacLeod

 

New Titles This Week

November 22nd, 2016
Hardcover
Fate Of Flames, Sarah Raughley (we’ll launch this book here on Saturday November 26th at 3pm, along with SW: Ahsoka by E.K. Johnston. You should come!) 

Arcanum Unbounded, Brandon Sanderson
Princess Diarist, Carrie Fisher
Fantastic Beasts And Where To Find Them, J.K. Rowling
Apes And Angels, Ben Bova
Moonglow, Michael Chabon
Charlie The Choo-Choo, Beryl Evans
Vindication Of Man, John C. Wright
Scythe, Neal Shusterman 

Trade Paperback
Forgotten Tale, J.M. Frey (signed copies!)
Dark Defiles, Richard Morgan
Borrowed Man, Gene Wolfe
Brothers Vonnegut, Ginger Strand
Impersonations, Walter Jon Williams
Once Upon A Crime, P.J. Brackston
In The Shadow Of Edgar Allan Poe, Leslie S. Klinger, editor 

Mass Market
The Operator, Kim Harrison